Sleep and Performance Research Center, Washington State University

Contact:
Hans P.A. Van Dongen
Position:
Director and Research Professor
Address:
PO Box 1495, 99224
City:
Spokane, WA
Country:
United States
Phone:
+1 509 358 7750
Fax:
+1 509 358 7810
Contact E-mail:
Research Domain
  • Basic Human
  • Clinical
  • Methodology / Technology
  • others
  • Basic Animal
Keywords
  • Biological Rhythms
  • Molecular Biology-Endocrinology-Biochemistry
  • Instrumentation-Methodology
  • Learning, Memory, Cognition
  • Sleep and Medical Disorders
  • Genetics of Sleep
  • Pharmacology of Sleep
  • Sleep and Body Functions (Cardio-Respiratory, Thermoregulation/Metabolism, Endocrine)
  • Sleep Physiology-Neurophysiology in Human
  • Sleep Physiology-Neurophysiology in Animal
  • Others

Laboratory description

The Sleep and Performance Research Center at Washington State University Spokane conducts human and animal studies in laboratory and field settings in support of basic and applied sleep research. The Center focuses on understanding the brain organization of sleep in humans and animals and on using this understanding to link sleep, by way of the underlying neurobiology, to key indicators of performance, be they physiological, behavioral or cognitive. The research contributes to sustaining human productivity, safety, health, and well-being.

The Sleep and Performance Research Center includes multiple laboratories, each headed by one of the core faculty of the Center. Core faculty members are internationally renowned for their scientific contributions, which have led to paradigm shifts in science and policy changes at the state and national levels.


Technical Capabilities and areas of expertise

 


Selected Publications in the 5 past years:

Out of a total of 322 in the past 5 years:

Davis CJ, Clinton JM, Bohnet SG, Taishi P, Honn KA, Krueger JM (2011). MicroRNA 132 alters sleep and varies with time in brain. J. Appl. Physiol. 111:665-672.

Davis CJ, Clinton JM, Krueger JM (2012). MicroRNA 138, let-7b and 125a inhibitors differentially alter sleep and EEG delta wave activity in rats. J Appl Physiol. 113:1756-1762.

Kapás L, Bohnet S, Traynor T, Majde JA, Szentirmai É, Magrath P, Taishi P, Krueger JM. (2008) Spontaneous and influenza virus-induced sleep are altered in TNFα double receptor deficient mice. J Appl Physiol 105:1187-1198.

Karatsoreos I.N., Wang, A., Sasanian, J., Silver, R. (2007). “A Role for Androgens in Regulating Circadian Behavior and the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.” Endocrinology, 148(11):5487-95.

Karatsoreos, I.N., Bhagat, S., Bowles, N.P., Weil, Z.M., Pfaff, D.W., McEwen, B.S. (2010) “Endocrine and physiological changes in response to chronic corticosterone: A potential model of the metabolic syndrome in mouse”. Endocrinology. 151: 2117-2127.

Krueger J.M., D.M. Rector, S. Roy, H.P.A. Van Dongen, G. Belenky, and J. Panksepp. Sleep as a fundamental property of neuronal assemblies. Nature Reviews Neuroscience. 9(12): 910-919, 2008.

Krueger JM, Taishi P, De A, Davis C, Winters BD, Clinton J, Szentirmai E, Zielinski MR. (2010) ATP and the purine type 2 X7 receptor affect sleep. J Appl Physiol. 109:1318-1327.

McCauley P, Kalachev LV, Smith AD, Belenky G, Dinges DF, Van Dongen HPA. A new mathematical model for the homeostatic effects of sleep loss on neurobehavioral performance. Journal of Theoretical Biology 2009; 256: 227–239.

Panksepp, J. (2009). Primary process affects and brain oxytocin. Biological Psychiatry, 65, 725-727.

Panksepp, J. (2011). Cross-species affective neuroscience decoding of the primal affective experiences of humans and related animals. PLoS One, 6(8): e21236.

Rector D.M., J.L. Schei, H.P.A. Van Dongen, G. Belenky, and J.M. Krueger. Physiological markers of local sleep. European Journal of Neuroscience 29(9): 1771-8, 2009.

Rector D.M., J.L. Schei, and M.J. Rojas. Mechanisms underlying state dependent surface evoked response patterns. Neuroscience 159: 115-126, 2009.

Szentirmai, É., L. Kapás, Y. Sun, R.G. Smith, and J.M. Krueger. The preproghrelin gene is required for normal integration of thermoregulation and sleep in mice. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 106:14069-14074, 2009.

Szentirmai É., Kapás L., Sun Y., Smith R.G., Krueger J.M. Restricted feeding-Induced sleep, activity and body temperature changes in normal and preproghrelin deficient mice. Am J Physiol. 2010 Feb;298(2):R467-77.

Van Dongen HPA, Belenky G, Krueger JM. A local, bottom-up perspective on sleep deprivation and neurobehavioral performance. Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, 2011; 11: 2414–2422.

Van Dongen HPA, Belenky G, Vila BJ. The efficacy of a restart break for recycling with optimal performance depends critically on circadian timing. Sleep, 2011; 34(7): 917–929.

Wisor JP, Jiang P, Striz M, O’Hara BF (2009) Effects of ramelteon and triazolam in a mouse genetic model of early morning awakenings, Brain Res, 1296:46-55

Wisor JP, Schmidt MA (2012) Interleukin 1 receptor signaling mediates methamphetamine- and sleep deprivation-induced hypersomnolence. Neurosci Lett, 513(2):209-13


Other laboratory Members

Title:  MD

Name:  Gregory Belenky

Email:  belenky@wsu.edu

Title:  PhD

Name:  Christopher J Davis

Email:  cjdavis@vetmed.wsu.edu

Title:  PhD

Name:  Lois James

Email:  lois_james@wsu.edu

Title:  PhD MD

Name:  Levente Kapás

Email:  kapas@wsu.edu

Title:  PhD

Name:  Ilia Karatsoreos

Email:  iIliak@vetmed.wsu.edu

Title:  PhD

Name:  James M. Krueger

Email:  krueger@vetmed.wsu.edu

Title:  PhD

Name:  Jaak Panksepp

Email:  jpanksepp@vetmed.wsu.edu

Title:  PhD MD

Name:  Éva Szentirmai

Email:  eszentirmai@wsu.edu

Title:  PhD

Name:  Bryan J. Vila

Email:  vila@wsu.edu

Title:  PhD

Name:  Jonathan P. Wisor

Email:  j_wisor@wsu.edu


Past Members

Title:  PhD

Name:  David M. Rector

Email:  david_rector@selinc.com

Title:  PhD

Name:  Peter McCauley

Email:  mccauleyPete@gmail.com

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